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Guide To The Different Types Of Cockroaches | Synergy²

Can You Tell An American Cockroach From An Oriental Cockroach? Your Guide To The Different Types Of Cockroaches

Did you know that there are 4,500 species of cockroaches in the world with 30 of those being pests? Are you wondering about the different types of cockroaches and aren’t sure about the difference between the types?

This article will explain the differences between Oriental and American cockroaches so you can tell what’s invading your home. Read on to discover the key differences and finally be able to identify them before it’s too late.

Why You Don’t Want Cockroaches

If you have cockroaches in your home, they eat just about anything and spread bacteria. They’ll spread bacteria throughout your home including your fridge, kitchen surfaces, cabinets, dishes, etc.

Some people are allergic to cockroaches as well and can trigger asthma symptoms especially in children. Cockroaches can carry bacteria such as Salmonella, E. Coli, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These bacteria can cause diarrhea, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and the list goes on.

They crawl in and eat whatever is around and then they’ll leave their feces in your cabinets. They crawl through places such as standing water, trash bins, septic pools, and sewer pipes. After crawling through these places, they can crawl all over your plates and get into your food as well.

General Appearance

If you suspect you have cockroaches, you’ll want to first determine if it’s a cockroach and not a cricket, beetle, or grasshopper. Cockroaches have broad bodies that are flat, long antennae, and long hind legs. Adult roaches have wings that fold flat on their backs but not all of them fly.

Most roaches are black or brown and are normally 0.07 inches to 3 inches in length. Look for a shield-shaped pronotum right behind their head.

What Is an American Cockroach?

An American Cockroach is actually the largest of the roaches that invade homes. They’re also known as the water bug, palmetto bug, and Bombay canary. It’s believed that they were brought on ships from Africa to the United States.

They have 6 legs, are oval in shape, have antennae, and are normally a reddish-brown which a yellowish figure 8 on their head. They’re normally between 1.4″ to 1.6″ long, but they can get bigger than 2″.

Can an American cockroach bite?  They can bite but rarely do. If they do bite it isn’t anything to worry about unless it gets infected.

American Cockroach Infestation

Are you wondering if you have an American Cockroach infestation?

You’ll see the roaches in your home normally heading to dark areas. They also leave behind their feces in dark areas where they hide. Their feces are often mistaken for mouse droppings. If you see egg capsules in your home, that’s a definite sign you have an infestation.

The eggs are normally near food sources or in basements. This roach also lets off a musty smell in the air, and if you have a sensitive nose you’ll be able to smell it.

Another tell-tale sign of an extensive infestation is the number of baby American cockroaches you see.  Usually, larger number of nymph and immature cockroaches are evidence of a more severe roach infestation.

Getting Rid of Them

Roaches are incredibly resilient, so it’s extremely difficult to get rid of them.

Did you know that they can live for weeks without their heads? First, you’ll want to do what’s called barrier exclusion, where you stop them from coming in. Seal up any cracks in your walls, any gaps near electric sockets, and drains. Use a silicone-based caulk to seal up these areas.

Make sure to keep your home clean as well since that’s less appealing to these roaches. Don’t let dishes pile up in the sink, always wipe down counters, sinks, tables, and floors. Also, keep food in airtight containers. Make sure to vacuum at least once a week as well.

If you think you have a roach infestation, you’ll want to contact a professional pest control service.

What Is an Oriental Cockroach?

An Oriental Cockroach is thought to be of African origin and is also known as a waterbug as well. They’re sometimes also called black beetle cockroaches since they have smooth and dark bodies. They can get into your home through gaps in siding or spaces under doors as well as drains, sewers, and pipes.

They’re either black or a dark reddish-brown color and the males grow to about 25 mm in length, whereas the females can be 32 mm in length with no wings. They do have wing pads that cover the first section of their bodies. Neither the male or female can fly.

Oriental Cockroach Infestation

You can tell you have an Oriental Cockroach infestation if you find egg cases around your home. They’re usually a reddish or dark brown color. These roaches usually have a musty smell that you can smell. They’re normally an outdoor species, usually found under debris, leaves, stones, firewood, and sewers.

You can also find them underneath porches. They’re more commonly inside the home during the summer months. They prefer damp and cool locations, so they will often head to the basement. You can find them around pipes, sinks, and toilets.

They will eat all types of food and garbage. They can also survive without food for a month. They are very dependent on water though and can’t survive as long without it. If you suspect you have an Oriental Roach infestation, contact a licensed pest control professional to come and take a look.

American Cockroach vs Oriental Cockroach

Whether you have an Oriental or American Cockroach, either one will wreak havoc in your home, so use these tips to identify which roach you have and start appropriate action.

If you suspect you have a roach problem don’t delay, contact us today and we can help you make your roach problem a thing of the past.

https://synergy2ms.com/how-to-get-rid-of-cockroaches/

https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/cockroaches/american-cockroaches/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_cockroach

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/roaches/american_cockroach.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_cockroach

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